Single-Family – 77 Highland View Drive Sutton, MA 01590 now has a new price of $385,000!

Location, Location! Motivated Seller! Resale at the sought-after Highlands, one of Sutton’s premier neighborhoods! Close to Pleasant Valley CC and 146. Tree lined, private yard with many perennials. Seller has made some major updates including newer roof (last seven years), windows on second floor, light fixtures and central air (2016)! Gorgeous updated kitchen (last two years) with all the amenities that will make you want to cook and entertain! New granite, gorgeous cabinetry and appliances. Newer pergo-type flooring throughout and recently updated bathrooms! Master with full bath and 7×6 walk in closet. Convenient first floor laundry, and a finished room in the lower level. Reap the benefits of Solar. Opportunity knocks – Put your personal touch on it to make this house your home.

This is a Colonial style home and features 9 total rooms, 2 full baths, 1 half bath, 4 bedrooms, 0.46 Acres, and is currently available for $385,000.

For complete details click here.

Ten Red Flags to Look Out for When Buying a Home

Buying a new home is an exciting prospect. Touring a house can feel like walking around your favorite store, picking out all of the things you love. It’s easy to get distracted by things like fresh paint or nice furniture and forget to look for important structural aspects of the home that can make or break a deal.

Most sellers will be honest and straightforward with you about the state of the home. In some cases, they are required by law to inform you about costly issues with the home (lead paint or sewage issues, for example). Other times, a seller is under no legal obligation to inform you about potential problems with the home. In these instances, you’ll need to rely on your own senses. To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of the top ten red flags to beware of when buying a home.

  1. Fresh paint 
    It’s common practice when selling a house to put a fresh coat of paint on the walls. It’s an inexpensive way to spruce up the home for potential buyers. Sometimes, however, the paint is used as a quick fix for hiding more serious issues. Water damage, mold, and mildew can all be covered up, momentarily, by a coat of paint.
  2. Strong odors
    We say “strong” rather than “bad” odors because sometimes someone selling a home will try to mask bad smells with air fresheners or candles. Bad smells in a house can be the result of plumbing issues, humidity, indoor smokers, water damage, pet urine, uncleanliness, and any number of undesirable things.
  3. Bad roofing
    Missing, broken or stacked shingles are all signs that the roof is in need of repair–a costly fix you probably want to avoid if buying a new home.
  4. Cracked foundation
    A damaged foundation could be a sign of serious structural problems with the house. Especially in sloped areas, cracked foundations can lead to water damage in the basement.
  5. Poor wiring 
    Don’t be afraid to ask to test out the lights and outlets in a home or take a look at breaker boxes. Flickering lighting and faulty outlets are signs that a home is in need of electric work.
  6. Pest issues 
    Many people underestimate the power of insects when it comes to damaging a home. Wood-eating termites and carpenter ants can both devastate the structure of a home and usually results in an expensive repair. Noticing ants is a huge red flag, but if you suspect a home could have an infestation for any reason try to get it inspected by a pest control firm before you make the deal.
  7. Locked doors and off-limit rooms 
    When touring a home there should be no areas that you aren’t allowed to see. A locked door or “do not enter” sign are all red flags that the seller may be hiding something in that room.
  8. Leaking faucets
    Small plumbing issues like leaky faucets or toilets that run excessively are signs that there could be even larger issues with the plumbing in the house.
  9. Deserted neighborhood
    Multiple homes for sale in the neighborhood, deteriorating buildings and closed businesses are all signs of a problem neighborhood. It could be due to economic issues or a decaying community, but either way these are things you’ll want to consider before moving into a new neighborhood.
  10. Defective windows 
    Windows that are sealed shut, fogged up, or won’t open or close are all signs of costly repairs. You’re going to depend on windows for the security of your home, lighting and aesthetic, and to a minor degree for retaining heat. They should all function properly.

Cooking Tips: Getting the Most of Your Garden

Cooking vegetables from your own garden is a great experience. In the same way that you appreciate a meal made from scratch more than a frozen dinner or takeout, cooking food that you grew yourself is an extremely rewarding feeling.

Aside from being delicious, growing your own food can help you save money, waste less food, consume less plastic packaging (helping the environment), and try out new recipes you normally wouldn’t.

When it comes to planting vegetables for cooking, however, there’s more to it than simply tossing some seeds in your garden. Here’s how to get the most out of growing your own vegetables for use on the dinner table.

Plant smart

One of the first mistakes beginner gardeners make is planting the wrong vegetables or the wrong proportions of vegetables. One or two squash plants, for example, will provide ample amounts of squash for most small families. So, think about the meals you love to cook and what vegetables they require. Then find out how much those plants yield.

Some vegetables can be planted and harvested at many times throughout the growing season. If you eat lots of leafy greens (lettuce, spinach, kale, etc.), don’t plant a huge row all at once. Instead, plant in intervals of two or three weeks so you can reap the rewards throughout the season. Similarly, many lettuces (such a romaine) are able to be continually harvested–that means there’s no need for pulling the whole planet out of the ground and replanting.

Plan your meals

To get the most out of your garden plan a weekly menu that incorporates items from your garden. If your tomatoes look like they’re ripening, plan for making tomato sauce, pizza, or caprese sandwiches the following week.

Get creative with recipes. If you have a surplus of peppers, try different stuffed pepper recipes. The internet is your best friend when it comes to discovering new uses for surplus vegetables.

Preserving

A garden should be useful to you year-round, not just during the autumn harvest season. There are several methods of preserving your vegetables. The way you choose depends on your own need. Common means of preservation include:

  • Freezing meals. Remember those stuffed peppers? You don’t have to eat them every day of the week once your peppers are ripe. Cook up some rice, beans, and sauce, stuff your peppers and bake. Eat however much you want and place the rest in airtight bags in the freezer. They’ll make great lunches for when you’re in a rush.
  • Blanching and steaming.  If you’re not quite sure how you’ll want to use your vegetables but you know you’ll use them later blanching and steaming are great options. Boil or steam them for five minutes then toss them into a bucket of ice-water to cool. Once cool, drain them and freeze them in bags.
  • Canning.  This method takes some preparation and research but canning is a great way to save fruits and vegetables for use throughout the year and are great if you don’t have extra space in your freezer for frozen vegetables.